Disclosure (The Goonies)

By now you probably know I LOVE movies!  I grew up watching tons of movies and still do so today.  A short while ago the movie, The Goonies was on television and I sat and watched it with my oldest daughter.  She really enjoyed the movie.  As I have stated before, now that I’m in recovery the Holy Spirit has allowed me to see movies differently and notice subtle (and sometimes blatant) recovery tones within the movie. 

The plot of this movie has been pasted below courtesy of Google:

The Goonies is a 1985 American adventure comedy film directed by Richard Donner, who produced with Harvey Bernhard. The screenplay was written by Chris Columbus from a story by executive producer Steven Spielberg. A band of pre-teens who live in the “Goon Docks” neighborhood of Astoria, Oregon, attempt to save their homes from demolition, and, in doing so, discover an old Spanish map that leads them on an adventure to unearth the long-lost fortune of One-Eyed Willy, a legendary 17th-century pirate. During the entire adventure, they are chased by a family of criminals, who also want the treasure for themselves.

What I saw in this movie was a humorous example of someone giving a “clinical disclosure” and then having his life transform because of letting go of all of his secrets.  Many men in recovery struggle with the idea of giving a full disclosure and live in fear of doing so.  This movie, although not therapy-accurate, brings humor to a very stressful and intense time in a man’s life.  Hopefully, men who have done this can see the humor in this movie as much as I do and men who fear doing a disclosure can  find the courage to do so after watching this movie.

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